2013 Golden Globes: British Actors of TV and Film Win Big

 

Michelle Dockery

 

The 70th annual Golden Globe Awards aired last night, with many entertainers from the UK scoring a win in various categories over their American competitors. These awards honor the best domestic and foreign actors, directors, films, and television shows; the winners are chosen by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association – an organization of journalists that cover the U.S. entertainment industry for a number of media outlets all over the world.

In case you missed it, the following serves as a brief recap of the British presence at the ceremony and other relevant highlights.

  • Les Misérables – directed by London-born Tom Hooper – won for Best Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical. During her acceptance speech when winning Best Supporting Actress for her role as Fantine in the film adaptation, Anne Hathaway joked to Tom Hooper  she “would not damage his reputation as an aloof Englishman by telling everyone that when I was crying on set, you were crying right along with me.” Another Londoner in the cast – Eddie Redmayne who shined in the role of Marius – was also in attendance and joined others on stage when the film won.
  • New mother Adele took home the Best Original Song award for the theme of Skyfall, the latest James Bond film.
  • Daniel Day-Lewis won Best Actor in a Drama for his portrayal of President Abraham Lincoln in Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln. His acceptance speech included the joke, “”Her majesty the Queen of England is about to parachute in to make a last minute bid for ‘Skyfall’.” A clip of Lincoln was introduced during the awards ceremony by a special surprise guest: Former President Bill Clinton.
  • Even the award for Best Animated Feature Film went to a UK-inspired work: Disney/Pixar’s Brave. The film revolves around a Scottish princess and features voiceover talent from Scots (Kelly Macdonald, Billy Connolly) and Brits (Emma Thompson, Julie Walters).
  • Homeland actor Damian Lewis beat out other all-American nominees for Best Actor in a Drama Series. The political thriller also won for Best TV Series – Drama and the award for Best Actress in a Drama Series went to Lewis’ co-star Claire Danes.
  • Though she did not attend the ceremony, Maggie Smith landed the award for Best Supporting Actress in a TV Series, Miniseries, or Made-for-TV Movie for her portrayal of the snarky Dowager Countess on Downton Abbey. 
  • Downton Abbey‘s Michelle Dockery (Lady Mary Crawley) earned a nomination in the Best Actress category but lost to Homeland‘s Claire Danes. Regardless, Dockery looked stunning in a figure-hugging white and gold dress. She was also a good sport when Aziz Ansari (from NBC’s Parks and Recreation) targeted her during a comedic moment while presenting alongside Jason Bateman. Ansari made a joke about drug-laced confectionaries, saying he hoped Michelle Dockery had more backstage and laughed at the use of the word “biscuits” by the British. The camera panned to Dockery giggling in response while covering her mouth in a moment of demure grace that her television role seems to have ingrained within her.
  • Lastly, British actor/comedian Sacha Baron Cohen took jabs at his Les Misérables costars while onstage to present the award for Best Animated Feature Film.

It should be noted that Benedict Cumberbatch was nominated for his acclaimed role in Sherlock but lost to Kevin Costner in the Best Actor in a Miniseries or TV Movie category. Ricky Gervais, who hosted the Golden Globes for the past two years but was ultimately ousted for his controversial jokes, was not in attendance but he was the punchline of a joke made by hosts Tina Fey and Amy Pohler.

The critical recognition of all these talented British entertainers at an American awards show reveals that anglomania is thoroughly embedded in our culture.

For a full list of nominees and winners, click here.

Comments

  1. avatarPhaedra says

    “Les Misérables – directed by London-born Tom Hooper – won for Best Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical. During her acceptance speech when winning Best Supporting Actress for her role as Fantine in the film adaptation, she joked to Tom Hooper she “would not damage his reputation as an aloof Englishman by telling everyone that when I was crying on set, you were crying right along with me.” Another Londoner in the cast – Eddie Redmayne who shined in the role of Marius – was also in attendance and joined others on stage when the film won.”

    **Even though most of us know it was Anne Hathaway who played “Fantine”, you inadvertently forgot her name.

    Great story though! Glad to see the Brits kick it on this side of the Pond!

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